Friday, October 9, 2009

Mellie and Madeleine

So I had a joke I wanted to write after finding today's quotation: the connections between Proust's ideas about sleep and psychology have so much in common with the Dollhouse that I'll be surprised if they don't show us a character named Madeleine. Oh wait.

















Topher and Mellie/November/Madeline found on Tvsquad



So, here's what I found yesterday (It comes after a fun description of dreamy sleep that I would like to quote but would not like to type, from the 'Saint-Loup at Doncieres' section of The Guermantes Way):





That kind of sleep is called 'sleeping like lead,' and it seems as though one has become, oneself, and remains for a few moments after such a sleep is ended, simply a leaden image. One is no longer a person. How then, seeking for one's mind, one's personality, as one seeks for a thing that is lost, does one recover one's own self rather than any other? Why, when one begins again to think, is it not another personality than yesterday's that is incarnate in one? One fails to see what can dictate the choice, or why, among the millions of human beings any one of whom one might be, it is on him who one was overnight that unerringly one lays one's hand? What is it that guides us, when there has been an actual interruption--whether it be that our unconsciousness has been complete or our dreams entirely different from ourselves? There has indeed been death, as when the heart has ceased to beat and a rhythmical friction of the tongue revives us. No doubt the room, even if we have seen it only once before, awakens memory in which other, older memories cling. Or were some memories also asleep in us of which we now become conscious? The resurrections at our awakening--after that healing attack of mental alienation which is sleep--must after all be similar to what occurs when we recapture a name, a line, a refrain that we had forgotten. And perhaps the resurrection of the soul after death is to be conceived as a phenomenon of memory.





This time the emphases are mine, so young can call me obnoxious, if you don't already.



But, come on, doesn't that sound just a little like the Dollhouse?

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